MBA Rankings 2015: Europe s Top One-Year MBA Programs #top #distance #mba


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MBA Rankings

The ranking is split into three categories: Best International One-Year Business Schools; Best Two-Year International Business Schools; and America’s Best Business Schools. MBA programs in Europe tend to be one year in length.

Alumni of INSEAD’s class of 2010 realized a five-year gain of $171,200, and it took the typical graduate 2.4 years to pay back their investment in the MBA.

Consulting was the top career industry for INSEAD graduates — 40% were employed by consultancy firms. McKinsey Company hired 120 graduates last year, Boston Consulting Group another 70, and Bain Company 44.

INSEAD’s stellar performance is illustrated by the fact that graduates from Stanford Graduate School of Business, the top ranked US program by Forbes, had a five-year gain of $89,100, and it took them 4.2 years to pay back their investment.

A one-year program offers a quicker ROI. It took only 2.6 years for the MBA classes of 2010 to pay off a one-year program, according to Forbes data. Two year international programs took 3.4 years to pay off; their US counterparts four years.

IMD slipped to No. 2 in this year’s ranking. Its graduates earned a median five-year salary gain of $163,600. IMD’s top employers included Accenture. Hilti, Dow Chemical, and Cisco Systems. But its MBA comes with a high price tag — $91,380 versus $68,740 for INSEAD.

The Best International One-Year Business Schools ranking is dominated by European schools. SDA Bocconi of Italy is ranked fourth, Spain’s IE Business School fifth.

There is also a strong showing for UK-based schools, with Cranfield School of Management, Oxford University’s Saïd Business School, Warwick Business School and Lancaster University Management School all in the top-10.

S P Jain School of Global Management in Australia, and Canada’s HEC Montréal are the only non-European schools ranked in the Forbes list.

S P Jain reported the highest job acceptance rate of all schools in the ranking. Three months after graduation, 97% of its class were employed. Alumni saw a median $51,800 gain on their investment five years after the MBA.

Forbes surveyed 17,400 alumni at 95 schools regarding their pre- and post-MBA compensation, career choices, and location.

The rankings measure total compensation, including salary, bonuses and exercised stock options. The “five-year MBA gain” represents the net cumulative amount the typical alumnus would have earned after five years by getting their MBA over staying in their pre-MBA career.

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